Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

Volume XVII (2001)

Series:

This volume contains both papers and commentaries originally presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the 2000-1 academic year. While three of the colloquia are dedicated to Plato, at least two of these explore issues of relevance for modem philosophy. For instance, the first colloquium explores parallels between ancient and modem treatments of the problem of parts and wholes. In the same spirit, one of the colloquia on Aristotle focuses on the different interpretations of his method in ethics given by two prominent modem interpreters. Similarly, the other colloquium draws some interesting comparisons between modern and Aristotelian treatments of empty terms in logic. The remaining colloquia deal with special topics in Hellenistic, Neoplatonic, and Presocratic philosophy, including the significance of the Strasbourg papyrus for our understanding of Empedocles.

Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy, 17 is also available in hardback (ISBN 90 04 12687 2)

Paperback:

EUR €88.00USD $108.00

Biographical Note

John J. Cleary, Ph.D. is Professor of Philosophy at Boston College and Senior Lecturer at NUl Maynooth (Ireland). He has served as director of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy, and is the Founding Editor of this series of Proceedings. His publications in ancient philosophy include: Aristotle on the Many Senses of Priority (Carbondale (IL), 1988) and Aristotle and Mathematics (Leiden, 1995). Currently, he is studying the role of mathematics in the theology of Proclus, as well as completing an analysis of Aristotle's Metaphysics XIII & XIV for Project Archelogos. Gary M. Gurtler, S.J., Ph.D. is Professor of Philosophy at Boston College. He has published extensively on ancient philosophy, with special attention to Neoplatonism, including a book on Plotinus: the Experience of Unity (Lang, 1988). Currently, he is concluding research on the psychology of Plotinus.

Readership

All specialists in ancient philosophy, including researchers, teachers, and graduate students in the twin fields of classics and philosophy, as well as generalists in the history of philosophy.

Information